NAS OS 4.x - Remote Access


Warning: For Remote Access it’s advised to give the NAS device a Static local IP address. See this chapter in the User Manual for how to configure a Static IPv4 IP address in NAS OS 4.x.


1. Seagate MyNAS

 

MyNAS allows you to access the device remotely by a name instead of an IP address.
For supplemental information please visit
the NAS OS 4 User Manual.

 

To enable this remote function:

  • Log in to the Dashboard as an Administrator

  • Click the Device Manager icon

  • Under “Customize” on the left, click “Network”

  • Under Network, go to the Remote Access tab

  • Find Seagate MyNAS in the drop down menu

  • Choose a unique MyNAS name

 

Once MyNAS is enabled and you are in a remote location with internet access:

  • The NAS’ dashboard will load and let you log in

  • From there you can manage the NAS device remotely

  • For example, adding a user or starting a backup

  • You can download or upload files using the File browser

 

There is also a Seagate MyNAS IOS and an Android app. These apps let you access your files remotely from a mobile device, offering the ability to download files to that mobile device and upload files from the mobile device to the NAS. The apps do not give you access to the Dashboard on a mobile device, however this is possible by using a mobile browser instead.

Instead of MyNAS you can choose DynDNS from the drop-down menu, then fill out the required Hostname, Username, and Password. For more information visit www.dyn.com

MyNAS is a very handy function for remote Dashboard management and a quick overview of the device’s status, however there are other remote functions that serve better for remote file transfers from personal computers.

 

 

 



2. Remote FTP and SFTP

FTP stands for “File Transfer Protocol” and SFTP brings an extra layer of Security to the service by encrypting the file transfer.
See this chapter in the NAS OS 4.x User Manual for supplemental information.

 

Getting started:

  • Log in to the NAS’ Dashboard as an Administrator

  • Click the Device Manager icon

  • Click on “Services” under Customize on the left

  • Find FTP and SFTP in the list of Services

  • Click “edit” to the right of the desired service(s), then click “Start”

 

Once the services’ status orbs are green they are ready to use locally, though for remote access some Port Forwarding will need to be configured in the router’s settings.

 

Port forwarding:

  • First, make a note of the NAS’ local IP address (preferably static)

  • This information can be found under Device Manager/Customize/Network/Connections

  • Look at the currently active LAN port (it displays which IP address it is using)

  • Now go to the Router’s Dashboard*1

 

Reference the Router’s user manual for details on how to access its Dashboard and configure Port Forwarding. Below is a basic description of the steps:

 
  • Find the Router’s Port Forwarding settings page (Often under “Network”)

  • There will be a function to add a new Port Forward configuration

  • Reference the IP address of the NAS, noted in a previous step

  • For FTP fill in port 21 wherever it asks for a Port number

  • For SFTP fill in port 22 wherever it asks for a Port number

  • If it asks which protocol to use, specify either both, or just TCP
     

The NAS’ FTP listening ports can be changed manually in Dashboard/Device Manager/Customize/Network/Port Forwarding.
You might choose to change the port for extra security*2 or because another device on the Network is already using the default port.

 

 

Establishing a remote FTP or SFTP connection

 

The best method is with an FTP client. There are a variety of free FTP clients available and some operating systems have built-in FTP clients.

When using an FTP client on the local network you’ll connect to the NAS device with its local IP address, however to access the NAS remotely you’ll connect to the Router’s external IP address. From there the Router recognizes its Port Forwarding settings (you’ve configured with the steps above) and forwards the connection through to the NAS.

The Router’s Dashboard is one place to find its external IP address. It will be listed as the WAN IP address and is commonly found in the Router’s most basic settings.

Another simple option is to ask Google: “What’s my IP address” - there are plenty of websites that will automatically*3 let you know which external IP address you are connecting from.

 

When remote:

  • An FTP client asking for a Host is asking the Network’s External IP address

  • There will be a login function; simply use a local NAS user’s login information

  • There will be an option to specify which Port you’d like to connect through

  • These are the Ports you configured in the Router’s Port Forwarding settings

 

Once connected you’ll be able to drag and drop files to upload or download, or you can use “copy and paste” to start a file transfer between the NAS server and the current remote location.

 

An FTP server can also be accessed from a browser with the following address format:

(s)ftp://username:password@External-IP-Address:port

For example: ftp://admin:adminpassword@24.568.345.36:21

 

This method allows access to the NAS’ files and lets you download these files remotely, however browsers (typically) do not support uploading files using this method.

 

 

 

3. Remote HTTP and HTTPS

MyNAS, discussed above, uses HTTP to access the NAS remotely by assigning a name to the NAS which can be used to establish the connection through http://mynas.seagate.com.

HTTP access can also be configured manually, or HTTPS can be used instead for an extra layer of security. The NAS won’t be accessed remotely by a name, but by an IP Address.

 

Getting started:

  • Log in to the NAS’ Dashboard as an Administrator

  • Click “Device Manager” and open “Network” under “Customize”

  • Go to the Port Forwarding Tab

  • Hover over the desired Protocol (HTTP or HTTPS)

  • Then on the right, click “edit” and click “enable”

  • Wait for the Protocols to have green status orbs
     

Port forwarding:

  • First, make a note of the NAS’ local IP address in its Dashboard (preferably static)

  • This information can be found under Device Manager/Customize/Network/Connections

  • Look at the currently active LAN port; it displays which IP address it is using

  • Now go to the Router’s Dashboard*1

 

Reference the Router’s user manual for details on how to access its Dashboard and configure Port Forwarding. Below is a basic description of the steps:

 
  • Find the Router’s Port Forwarding settings page (Often under “Network”)

  • There will be a function to add a new Port Forward configuration

  • Reference the IP address of the NAS, noted in a previous step

  • For HTTP, fill in port 80 wherever it asks for a Port number

  • For HTTPS, fill in port 443 wherever it asks for a Port number

  • If it asks which protocol to use, specify either both, or just TCP
     

When Remote:

 

This will give you remote access to the NAS’ Dashboard.





 

Footnotes:

 

*1 In most cases the Router’s IP address is almost exactly the same as the NAS’ IP address. Simply replace the last set of digits with “1” in a browser’s address bar and hit Enter. If you do not know the IP address and correct login information for the router, try the default login information found on the router itself, or on the manufacturer’s website.

 

*2 Changing the default ports can increase security because there are bots that ping random IP addresses through default ports. Changing default ports can decrease the chances that your server will be pinged by unwanted guests. Strong user passwords are the best repellant.  

 

*3 All websites you visit automatically log where you’re connecting from behind the scenes, otherwise they wouldn’t know where to send information back to. The websites mentioned above simply have the additional feature of displaying your location by its IP address.

 

*4 When using HTTPS - Depending on the browser you’re using to connect to the NAS, you’ll receive a “Certificate-Not-Trusted” warning message before being able to establish the connection. You might have to click “advanced” and “continue” before the browser connects to the NAS.


This happens because the browser recognizes the NAS is using HTTPS, however it cannot establish why the NAS is using this secure protocol. In most cases when HTTPS is used, it’s for an online banking website, or an online shopping site for example. These types of sites have registered certificates which browsers will recognize and automatically allow. Since the NAS is a personal device, it does not have an official certificate recognized by browsers. However the connection itself is no less secure.

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